Lam says extradition bill will end without debate or vote

People watch telecast that Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam makes an announcement on an extradition bill, in Hong Kong, on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Chief Executive Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city, bowing to one of the protesters' demands. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. It sparked massive protests that have become increasingly violent and caused the airport to shut down earlier this month.(AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Riot police aim at protesters outside Mong Kok police station during a mod protests in Hong Kong on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city, bowing to one of the protesters' demands. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. It sparked massive protests that have become increasingly violent and caused the airport to shut down earlier this month. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
A man watches the television message that Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam makes an announcement on the extradition bill, at a home electronics retailer in Hong Kong, on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Chief Executive Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city, bowing to one of the protesters' demands. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. It sparked massive protests that have become increasingly violent and caused the airport to shut down earlier this month. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
FIEL - In this Sept. 3, 2019, file photo, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks during a press conference in Hong Kong. Hong Kong's government has a meeting scheduled on Wednesday, Sept. 4 amid speculation leader Carrie Lam may formally withdraw an extradition bill as protesters have demanded. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
High school students wearing masks, deliver leaflets to support the school boycott, in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said Tuesday she has never tendered her resignation to China over the anti-government protests that have roiled the city for three months. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Riot police aim at protesters outside Mong Kok police station during a mod protests in Hong Kong on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city, bowing to one of the protesters' demands. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. It sparked massive protests that have become increasingly violent and caused the airport to shut down earlier this month. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, seen in a telecast, makes an announcement in Hong Kong, on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Chief Executive Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city, bowing to one of the protesters' demands. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. It sparked massive protests that have become increasingly violent and caused the airport to shut down earlier this month.(AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
In this image made from video provided Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019 by Hong Kong Government Information Services, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks in the television message, in Hong Kong. Chief Executive Lam announced Wednesday the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that sparked months of demonstrations, bowing to one of the protesters' demands in the hope of ending the increasingly violent unrest. The words, bottom, read "First, the government will officially withdraw the bill." (Hong Kong Government Information Services via AP)
A woman walks past an electronic board showing Hong Kong share index outside a local bank in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Asian stock markets rose Wednesday following surprise weakness in U.S. manufacturing and wrangling in Britain over the country's departure from the European Union. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
A man watches the television message that Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam makes an announcement on the extradition bill, at a home electronics retailer in Hong Kong, on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Chief Executive Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city, bowing to one of the protesters' demands. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. It sparked massive protests that have become increasingly violent and caused the airport to shut down earlier this month. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Riot police in formation outside Mong Kok police station during a mod protests in Hong Kong on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city, bowing to one of the protesters' demands. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. It sparked massive protests that have become increasingly violent and caused the airport to shut down earlier this month. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

HONG KONG — Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam says the extradition bill that sparked months of demonstrations will be formally withdrawn in the legislative council without the need for debate or vote.

Lam made her first live remarks on the withdrawal of the bill at a news conference Thursday. She said there will be no debate and no voting in the council, which resumes meeting next month and is packed with pro-Beijing lawmakers.

Withdrawal of the bill meets one of protesters' demands, but the activists have vowed not to yield until the government accepts other demands including an independent investigation into alleged police brutality against protesters, the unconditional release of those detained and democracy.

The massive protests since June have disrupted transportation links around the city and at its international airport.

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