China looks unlikely to give in after US tariff hike

In this Aug. 29, 2018, photo, a man works in an auto parts factory in Liaocheng in eastern China's Shandong province. The Trump administration announced Monday, Sept. 17, 2018, that it will impose tariffs on $200 billion more in Chinese goods starting next week, escalating a trade war between the world's two biggest economies and potentially raising prices on goods ranging from handbags to bicycle tires. (Chinatopix via AP)
Mats Harborn, president of European Union Chamber of Commerce in China, speaks about trade war as he released a document titled: "European Business in China – Position Paper" at a hotel in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018. China said Tuesday it will take "counter-measures" to U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to raise tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese imports and an American business group warned a "downward spiral" in their trade battle appears certain. American companies and trading partners including the European Union and Japan have longstanding complaints about Chinese market barriers and industrial policy. But they object to Trump's tactics and warn the dispute could chill global economic growth and undermine international trade regulation. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
In this Sept. 16, 2018, photo, American flags are displayed together with Chinese flags on top of a trishaw in Beijing. The American Chamber of Commerce in China says Beijing will "dig its heels in" after U.S. tariff hikes and appealed for a negotiated end to their trade battle. The chamber on Tuesday, Sept. 18 warned a "downward spiral" appears certain after President Donald Trump approved a tariff hike on $200 billion of Chinese imports in a dispute over Beijing's technology policy. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

BEIJING — Exporters scrambled to replace lost orders after U.S. President Donald Trump raised tariffs in July on $50 billion of Chinese imports. Waves of job losses loom over factory towns. But Chinese leaders expressed confidence in their $12 trillion-a-year economy and refused to budge on tactics they see as a path to prosperity and global influence.

Economists, political analysts and business groups say China's leaders appear no more likely to back down after Trump approved penalties Monday on $200 billion more of Chinese goods.

The chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in China, William Zarit, said Tuesday in a statement, "Contrary to views in Washington, China can — and will — dig its heels in and we are not optimistic about the prospect for a resolution in the short term."

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